Belgium

A film made at home; an uncompromising look at ways in which parenthood and the process of filmmaking crush into each other. Through a collection of family videos, the film challenges the dynamics of agency that children and grown-ups have over their images. Different forms of entangled love and violence are rendered visible and audible within the household setting in an honest attempt to understand where light comes from — and all the while, the police are outside the window.

Country

Run Time

25 mins

culture

(cultuur)

Belgian filmmaker and cinematographer Fairuz Ghammam’s warm, generous work explores aspects of (auto)biography, shared authorship, and collaborative practices.

Staged as a walk through her hometown, Kortrijk, Culture riffs on these themes, sewing kernels of family history through a narrative, and a gaze, that oscillates between private and public space. How many memories and storylines can coexist?

Director

Country

Run Time

15 mins

After an election that has shaken its already precarious political and economic stability, DR Congo is trying to revive its project to build Africa’s largest power plant on the Congo River. Kinshasa, the capital, remains in darkness while its population struggles for access to light. Rising Up at Night subtly portrays a population that is reinventing itself in spite of everything, in an environment plagued by the violence and beauty of Kinshasa’s nights and the uncertainty of the next day.

Director

Run Time

90 mins

N.P

(N.P)

Based on the 1990 experimental novel by Japanese author Banana Yoshimioto, Lisa Spilliaert’s feature debut N.P is a silent film translation of the text into a cinematic scenario. Translation itself is at the heart of N.P’s narrative, which details the compilations and absurdities of protagonist Kazami’s attempts to translate the short stories of fictional author Sarao Takase, as well as her sometimes disturbing interactions with the late author’s children. The previous three translators of Takase’s writing committed suicide in mysterious circumstances and Kazami’s encounters with his daughter (and lover) Sui increasingly pull her into a world of darkly chaotic energy.

Original book:

BANANA YOSHIMOTO “N.P” (published by Kadokawa Shoten Publishing Co., Ltd. in Japan) © 1990 BANANA YOSHIMOTO / “N.P”.

Director

Country

Run Time

60 mins

Three young men—two brothers and their cousin—meet on a dense summer night to feel the “high” of a dozen “Hasiklidika” songs; Rebetiko songs from the beginning of the 20th century which celebrate the effects of Hashish. But beyond the pleasures of drugs, it is here a question of love, of joy and sadness, a search for freedom and political commitment… Little by little, yesterday’s counterculture, made out of poverty and violence, and built on the pains of exile, reverberates the one of today. —Elise Florenty & Marcel Türkowsky

Countries

Run Time

54 mins

This day won’t last

(هذا اليوم لن يدوم)

A day that could also be a life. A young man who could also be an older woman. A nightmare that could also be a dream. In Tunisia, while it could also be somewhere else: on the border between the necessity and the fear to make a film, the necessity and the fear for the revolution, This day won’t last is a cooperation with a distance. That is how this self-portrait turns into a group portrait. Clandestine, but straight from the heart: an end that could also lead to a new beginning. —Mouaad el Salem

Director

Countries

Run Time

26 mins

In a Kishasha neighbourhood faced with near-constant power outages, residents find creative solutions to the lack of light. The promise of a consistent source of electricity is found in the construction of a hydropower scheme, long in development but not yet completed. The practical and philosophical implications of living in darkness are pondered in this short film.

Director

Run Time

21 mins

A Town Called Panic

(Panique au village)

Hilarious and frequently surreal, the stop-motion extravaganza A TOWN CALLED PANIC has endless charms and raucous laughs for children from eight to eighty. PANIC stars three plastic toys named Cowboy, Indian and Horse who share a rambling house in a rural town that never fails to attract the weirdest events.

Countries

Run Time

76 mins

Back to 2069

(Πίσω στο 2069)

Back to 2069 looks at the eroded landscape of the Greek militarized Aegean island Lemnos, a political space where a myth meets contemporary concerns upon the relation of virtual and real image production. On the island, a solitary man shape-shifts from argonaut to avatar through various hallucinations, experiencing different states of embodiment and disembodiment. Although he exiled himself from Athens to escape the crisis, past and future scenarios of conflict are gradually catching up on him. What appears to be a fiction is made out of documentary footage that interweaves the man’s venture on the island with recorded Arma 3 video-game sessions from Youtube. —Elise Florenty & Marcel Türkowsky

Oumoun

(Oumoun)

Dear grandma, you’ll be surprised to hear my voice in your language…'”

In Oumoun Brussels filmmaker Fairuz Ghammam plays the recording of a spoken letter that was never sent to her elderly grandmother in Mahdia, Tunisia.

In the company of the camera, the lines become a voice over, as we witness a dialogue across languages, across cultures, across generations.

Country

Run Time

15 mins