Lebanon

This fourth chapter of Arsanios’ Who is Afraid of Ideology? series continues a collaborative investigation of anti-capitalist ideas around property and land ownership in Lebanon. The film’s figurative reverse shot reflects land as an autonomous, living object that inherently resists notions of property. Instead, matter and land become witness to the interconnectedness of the geological, the historical, the legal and the agricultural – generating an ecology of thought centred around land as a site of communalisation and rehabilitation.

Director

Countries

Run Time

34 mins

Christian Ghazi’s incendiary, avant-garde masterpiece ends with the send-off, “I don’t care when or how I will die, as long as there are armed men who will continue the march, shaking the earth with their uproar so that the world won’t sleep heavily over the bodies of the laborious, miserable and oppressed men.”

Selected by Artist in Profile Marwa Arsanios, who will introduce the film

Director

Country

Run Time

64 mins

Douma Underground

(Douma taht al Ard)

‘With the barrel bombs falling on Ghouta, the Eastern suburbs of Damascus, civilians sought shelter in the basements of their homes. I was one of them, holding on to my camera. I tried to film what I couldn’t express in words.’

Director

Countries

Run Time

11 mins

At a remove from cinema’s and television’s alluring veneer, there exists an exploited class of worker—relegated to the margins or hidden behind the scenes. In Amateurs, Stars and Extras or the labor of love, Arsanios furnishes us with an inversion of this dynamic in which she casts ‘amateurs’ and ‘extras’ in the roles of central characters. And like them, a group of domestic workers, whose care-work is often rendered invisible, is also brought to the fore to become central to the project. In Amateurs, Stars and Extras , migrant workers—most of them women of colour—come to embody something beyond displacement or exploitation as subtle but no less trenchant forms of resisting the performance of labour are proffered. —Tendai John Mutambu

Director

Countries

Run Time

27 mins

Have you Ever Killed a Bear or Becoming Jamila exposes the labour of performance, namely: the work of portraying a historical subject who became an emblem of resistance. In this portrait of the Algerian freedom fighter Jamila Bouhired, Arsanios brings into play this radical figure’s representation in Gillo Pontecorvo’s 1966 film The Battle of Algiers and her assimilation and promotion through the Arab cultural magazine Al-Hilal. From the history of socialist projects in Egypt, anti-colonial wars in Algeria, and their relationship to feminism, Becoming Jamila examines the marginalisation of women in the public sphere and how certain historic moments of conflict, like the Algerian war, ushered in exceptions to this age-old form of gendered repression. —Tendai John Mutambu

Director

Country

Run Time

25 mins

Christian Ghazi’s incendiary, avant-garde masterpiece ends with the send-off, “I don’t care when or how I will die, as long as there are armed men who will continue the march, shaking the earth with their uproar so that the world won’t sleep heavily over the bodies of the laborious, miserable and oppressed men.”

Selected by Artist in Profile Marwa Arsanios, who will introduce the film

Director

Country

Run Time

64 mins

A documentary about love and place. A Lebanese gay couple decide to take a forbidden road trip to Ramallah. The film is recorded with their camera as they chronicle their journey. Though the couple’s conversations, the audience is invited into the universe of a fading city.

Presented in a joint UK premiere with Safar: The Festival of Popular Arab Cinema

Director

Country

Run Time

19 mins

The transit of a sacrificed lamb in the trunk of her relative’s car provides a starting point to reflect on the exchange of food between the artist’s mother’s family in Syria and her family in Lebanon, and on the exchange of language, as a text roams among cities.

Director

Country

Run Time

25 mins