South Korea

Turn Left, Turn Right

(បត់ឆ្វេងបត់ស្តាំ)

Turn Left, Turn Right is a narrative feature following Kanitha (played by artist/filmmaker Kanitha Tith), a free-spirited young woman in Phnom Penh who doesn’t conform to society’s (and her mother’s) expectations. Easily prone to daydreams, Kanitha floats by working at a rock club and at a hotel, riding her motorbike across the city and generally being restless, unsettled and at times self-sabotaging. But this lifestyle is increasingly out of step not only with her mother’s demands, but also with her father’s deteriorating health. When she needs to step in and care for him, engaging with dreams might provide a potential solution to his suffering.

Director

Run Time

68 mins

Hair is a piece of head

(머리는 머리의 부분)

“The question always has been whether these stories of Hawai‘i have any worth to anyone in Gwangju, or vice versa. Furthermore, should the worth be the end of all stories? Why should one care, and how does one really care about the trouble beyond a national border, let alone the border of one’s skin? Here, does film educate about this method to care; or is it regenerating and readjusting the area of one’s skin?” —Sung Hwan Kim

Director

Run Time

25 mins

A respiratory exchange between the viewer and a bamboo forest.

‘Through the acts of very close looking and capturing on film, Minyong Jang relishes the discovery of all manner of perhaps otherwise unnoticed visual poetry. His films are also significantly about the advantageous juxtaposition of one image with another, the resulting one-plus-one adding up to considerably more than two. Take, for example, the clear sense of closure at the conclusion of The Breath, his just-completed film. All of the shots until just before the end result from the camera having been hand-held and pretty much always in motion. Jang seems to be saying, “Let’s just explore this small bit of nature and see what we discover.” At the end of the film, however, all motion stops. The highly abstract images from the now tripod-mounted camera, along with Jang’s precise editing, tell us without fanfare that the end is at hand. He thus subtly creates what musicians call a perfect-authentic cadence, the ultimate sense of closure. All of his work is about the unique kind of silence that film viewing sometimes engenders. What we are offered in these works is not just silence in the usual sense, but rather, the opportunity to experience the kind of concentrated absence of sound that lets our minds flow into their own silent and/or sonic realms.’ — Charles Boone, San Francisco Cinematheque

Director

Country

Run Time

10 mins

Love before Bond is a fairy tale about people who have never met. Through his own experience with displacement, Kim tackles identity or cultural otherness by using explicit references to African-American literature, notably of James Baldwin; and to William Shakespeare or Franz Schubert.

Director

Run Time

26 mins

Art director Naoki Hayakawa works 16 hours a day in a creative, neo-totalitarian advertisement company in Tokyo. The pressure of this situation causes him to regularly lapse into a twilight state between sleep and wakefulness, where he has strange and wonderful dreams. When he tells his superiors about his troubled state of mind, they ask that he exploit these dreams by using ideas from them in his work. This triggers a different sort of crisis as Naoki realises his whole self is being instrumentalised.

Countries

Run Time

25 mins

Once upon a time there was an ugly and violent monster. But on meeting – and attempting to eat – a young girl, something inside him changes.

Director

Country

Run Time

5 mins

A North Korean monument is brought to life, playing with the significance of ‘the embrace’ as representation of the reunification in the South Korean national psyche. Two figures embrace in joy, only to have their bliss dissipate and a new, unexpectedly uncomfortable, era to emerge.

Country

Run Time

5 mins