Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival

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The Little Girl Who Sold the Sun

In-Person screening

Maltings Henry Travers
22 September 2019, 18:00 – 18:45

The Little Girl Who Sold the Sun follows Sili, a girl traversing Dakar’s many obstacles with her crutches. After starting to work as a newspaper vendor, she quickly runs afoul of territorial boys who see her as a competitor. Djibril Diop Mambéty’s final film is handled with gentle lightness and grace, providing incontrovertible evidence of his place not only as a master of African cinema, but as a pivotal figure in the history of cinema. — Herb Shellenberger

Date: 2022-09-28 10:12:34
ID: 2753
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The Little Girl Who Sold the Sun

The Little Girl Who Sold the Sun follows Sili, a girl traversing Dakar’s many obstacles with her crutches. After starting to work as a newspaper vendor, she quickly runs afoul of territorial boys who see her as a competitor. Djibril Diop Mambéty’s final film is handled with gentle lightness and grace, providing incontrovertible evidence of his place not only as a master of African cinema, but as a pivotal figure in the history of cinema. —Herb Shellenberger

“Cinema was born in Africa, because the image itself was born in Africa. The instruments, yes, are European, but the creative necessity and rationale exist in our oral tradition. As I always tell the children, in order to make a film, you must only close your eyes and see the images. Open your eyes, and the film is there. I want these children to understand that Africa is a land of images, not only because images of African masks revolutionized art throughout the world but as a result, simply and paradoxically, of oral tradition. Oral tradition is a tradition of images. What is said is stronger than what is written; the word addresses itself to the imagination, not the ear. Imagination creates the image and the image creates cinema, so we are in direct lineage as cinema’s parents.” —Djibril Diop Mambéty in conversation with Nwachucwu Frank Ukadike, “Transition 78” n. 2, 1999

With the support of the Institut Français

Director

Djibril Diop Mambéty

UK Premiere

Production Country

Senegal

Production Year

1999

Duration

45 mins

Print Contact

Agathe Morisse