Renèe Helèna Browne

17 September 2020

Run Time

42 mins
Tickets available soon

Daddy’s Boy

In Daddy’s Boy, Renèe Helèna Browne creates an intimate portrait of their Irish homeland, documenting their father as he undertakes tasks around the house and on a rural farm. Browne’s voice-over draws the viewer in as a confidante, introducing elements of narrative from the 1990 sci-fi Jurassic Park and using the character of T-Rex to explore patriarchal dynamics, gender conformity and societal expectations.

In Daddy’s Boy, Renèe Helèna Browne creates an intimate portrait of their Irish homeland, documenting their father as he undertakes tasks around the house and on a rural farm. Browne’s voice-over draws the viewer in as a confidante, introducing elements of narrative from the 1990 sci-fi Jurassic Park and using the character of T-Rex to explore patriarchal dynamics, gender conformity and societal expectations.

The work opens with Browne’s father manoeuvring a digger into position. The pastoral scenery and familial space are witnessed from Browne’s own perspective: a curious donkey sniffs the camera, washing dries in the living room and their father lazes on the couch. Browne’s voice breaks this everyday scene with viscerally violent descriptions from the dystopic thriller Jurassic Park, “A tearing laceration runs from his shoulder down his torso. At the edge of the wound, the flesh is shredded and at the centre, the shoulder is dislocated with pale bone exposed.The work is punctuated by images of the artist moulding and reshaping a piece of purple plasticine into the form of a dinosaur.

Daddy’s Boy takes its title from a photograph by Phyllis Christopher, first published in the Lesbian Erotica magazine On Our Backs. The image captures an embrace between two people, one bearing a tattoo with the words ‘Daddy’s Boy’ in gothic font. Browne’s Daddy’s Boy examines heteronormative expectations and explores the potential for change. Browne investigates human control over natural impulse, traditional structures and belief systems, and what happens when these are challenged or ruptured. In Jurassic Park, the human-driven experiment begins to deteriorate and eventually descends into chaos. Daddy’s Boy journeys to a similar point of break-down, as the artist’s voice begins to change and distort, and the familiar imagery morphs into abstraction. —Claire Hills

Daddy’s Boy was commissioned for the 16th Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival 2020.

Director Biography

Renèe Helèna Browne (Ireland) is an artist based between Glasgow and Donegal. Browne makes vocal soundscapes, essay films and angsty drawings, focusing on schisms and transitions between language and the body. They are currently Research Associate with Centre of Contemporary Art Derry for 2020 and was Graduate Resident at Hospitalfield (Scotland) in 2019. They were selected for Platform, the emerging artist commission for the 2018 Edinburgh Art Festival and are a recent graduate of the Master of Fine Art programme at the Glasgow School of Art. They have upcoming solo exhibitions at Lunchtime, Glasgow (2020) and Intermedia, CCA Glasgow (2021). Browne is supported by the Arts Council of Ireland.

Director Filmography

Daddy’s Boy (2020), Sacred Disease (2019), Sacred Disease: Epilogue (2019), R69-32 (2016)

Production Year

2020

Premiere

Director

Countries

Dialogue Language

English

Primary Contact

RENEE HELENA BROWNE