17th Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival 2021

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The 17th edition of the Festival has now finished. Thank you to everyone who joined us both in Berwick and online. We are so pleased and humbled by the support and enthusiasm for the programme and it has been wonderful to be able to connect with audiences this year.

Although the Festival is over there is plenty left to do. You can watch back all past online events, listen to filmmakers discuss their work on our podcasts series and read insightful essays that explore the programme in more depth.

 

 

Call for Chair of BFMAF Board of Trustees

Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival (BFMAF) is seeking a new Chair of its Board of Trustees. Huw Davies, the current Chair and Festival Co-founder, will step down at the end of February 2022.

19 August 2021

Guiding Thoughts

What is the Fate of the Middle Place? This title of our Young Filmmakers’ new short film refers to their future vision of Berwick-upon-Tweed. The question could be asked of the festival itself, where it acts as a middle place, a meeting between our local communities and the international communities of artists and filmmakers, and…

Propositions

The Propositions strand is a hybrid of discussion and online screenings that dive deep into new cinema and share discoveries encountered through artists’ and filmmakers’ research, experience and practice.

Focus

Izza Génini

A pioneering woman in Moroccan cinema, Izza Génini’s practise sits solely within the realm of narrative documentary. As someone who was born in Morocco, grew up in France and returned there as an adult, her films grapple with themes such as diasporic identity and traditional Moroccan heritage, particularly focusing on the music of the country.

Focus

Angelo Madsen Minax

US-born filmmaker and artist Madsen Minax crafts his short films and videos in various breaths—ever so often personal, experimental and transgressive ones. Within these breaths, Minax approaches and investigates queerness, trans identity and sexuality, mysticism and death, family bonds and social justice, in a many-layered approach to image-making.

At Those Terrifying Frontiers Where the Existence and Disappearance of People Fade Into Each Other
Basel Abbas, Ruanne Abou-Rahme
Palestine
21 mins
Don’t Rush
Elise Florenty, Marcel Türkowsky
Belgium, France, Germany
54 mins
Fuel
Yu Araki
Japan
17 mins
LIQUID STRANGER
Stefan Ramírez Pérez
Germany
14 mins
Marriage Story
Jessica Dunn Rovinelli
United States
9 mins
Patrick
Luke Fowler
United Kingdom
21 mins
The Cypress Dance
Mariana Caló, Francisco Queimadela
Portugal
37 mins
The Name I Call Myself
Rhea Dillon
United Kingdom
15 mins
The Unseen River
Phạm Ngọc Lân
Laos, Vietnam
23 mins
This day won’t last
Mouaad el Salem
Belgium, Tunisia
26 mins
Up at Night
Nelson Makengo
Belgium, Democratic Republic of the Congo
21 mins
Way My It Did I
Maria Anastassiou
United Kingdom
36 mins
Existence and disappearance: On documentation, the un-real image, and surveillance as a biopolitical weapon against Palestinian life in Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou-Rahme’s At Those Terrifying Frontiers
by Jessica McGoff

Essay

An interview with Mariana Caló and Francisco Queimadela
by Herb Shellenberger

Essay

Yu Araki in conversation

Podcast

Stefan Ramírez Pérez in conversation

Podcast

Rhea Dillon in conversation

Podcast

Phạm Ngọc Lân in conversation

Podcast

Nelson Makengo in conversation

Podcast

Moouad el Salem in conversation

Podcast

Maria Anastassiou in conversation

Podcast

Luke Fowler in conversation

Podcast

Jessica Dunn Rovinelli in conversation

Podcast

Elise Florenty and Marcel Türkowsky in conversation

Podcast

In, Out, Out, In: Maria Anastassiou’s Way My It Did I
by María Palacios Cruz

Essay

Focus

Payal Kapadia

Over the past decade, Mumbai-based filmmaker Payal Kapadia has built up a remarkable collection of short films. In particular, a trilogy of sorts made between 2015–18—The Last Mango Before the Monsoon, 2015; Afternoon Clouds, 2017; And What is Summer Saying, 2018—stands as a massive achievement and as a hybrid form of new cinema.

Focus

Ayo Akingbade

In her own words, Ayo Akingbade’s work “addresses notions of urbanism, power and stance”. Characteristic of her films is a contemplation and celebration of the rhythms of everyday London life, as well as the histories and legacies that move through it.