Maltings Henry Travers

Located on Eastern Lane, The Maltings is the festival’s main hub. The Henry Travers Studio at The Maltings is named after the eponymous film and stage actor, whose best known role was guardian angel Clarence Odbody in the 1946 film It’s a Wonderful Life. The Henry Travers Studio a black-box studio space which can seat up to 120.

Eastern Lane, Berwick-upon-Tweed, TD15 1AJ

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Friday 3 March, 14:30

Meriem Bennani’s playful sci-fi trilogy mixes live action, day-glo animation, and a kaleidoscopic score by Fatima Al Qadiri to explore the entangled politics of immigration, state control and the border zone. Episodes focus on inhabitants of the fictional island of CAPS (short for ‘capsule’), a magnetically sealed megalopolis created to intercept refugees attempting to teleport illegally into the US. Citizens work together to develop new modes of defiance and resistance, harnessing not only emergent biotechnologies but also the liberatory potential of joy and humour.

Director

Run Time

75 mins
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Sunday 5 March, 16:30

Translating as “Maputo, I Love You”, Brazilian filmmaker Ariadine Zampaulo’s hybrid cine-poem stiches together elements of documentary, fabulation, performance, and soundscape to produce a polyphonic portrait of Mozambique’s capital city. Her camera beautifully captures the flow and rhythms of urban life unfolding over the course of a single day: Revellers spill from nightclubs as workers board commuter trains; tourists and joggers vie for position in the city’s ancient streets; and a local radio station announces the disappearance of a bride.

Countries

Run Time

60 mins
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Sunday 5 March, 14:00

Rea Tajiri’s vibrant, tender cine-poem is fashioned in collaboration with her mother, Rose, as together they confront the painful, curious reality of wisdom “gone wild” in the shadows of dementia. Made over sixteen years, the film blends fact and fiction, humour and sadness, to stage a fragmented, dream-like encounter between mother and daughter that blooms into an affectionate portrait of love, care, and a relationship transformed.

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Run Time

84 mins
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Sunday 5 March, 10:30

An open discussion with Markku Lehmuskallio & Anastasia Lapsui who will speak about their collaborative, award-winning filmmaking practice and their personal histories. Prior to filmmaking, Lehmuskallio was a forester, while Lapsui was the first Indigenous radio broadcaster in her region. Since their first work together in 1992, they have forged a collaborative “Fourth Cinema” approach to filmmaking through documentary and fiction forms. This conversation will explore beyond the four titles in our retrospective, towards a richer picture of their filmmaking oeuvre.

Run Time

60 mins
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Sunday 5 March, 12:30

An in-person screening-performance by award-winning Iranian artist, Maryam Tafakory, whose textual and filmic collages interweave poetry, documentary, archival, and found material.

“To the outsiders, the bystanders, the virtual onlookers, to the disaster capitalist, the hopeless, the failed revolutionist—from wherever you are standing, come a step closer and listen as we try to rewind, to fast forward, to pause, to look away…”

Run Time

60 mins
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Saturday 4 March, 10:30

Christopher Ulutupu is an artist of Samoan/Niuean/German descent currently residing in Wellington. Through a richly pop, queer and celebratory Pacific lens he creates new narrative forms opening up conversations around collaboration, connection, and disconnection. The Pleasures of Unbelonging is a new commission presented by CIRCUIT with support from TAUTAI, Creative New Zealand and BFMAF. Following its world premiere screening Christopher will be in conversation with May Adadol Ingawanij, Professor of Cinematic Arts at University of Westminster.

Run Time

60 mins
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Saturday 4 March, 16:15

A presentation of Helena Solberg’s debut short films (1962-64) alongside her 1982 feature From the Ashes: Nicaragua Today which brings a multi-layered feminist perspective to a political and societal portrait of the country following the 1979 insurrection that overthrew the Somoza dictatorship. Her shorts, made during one of the most repressive moments of the Brazilian military dictatorship, examine the unliveable conditions experienced by communities under oppression and emphasise women’s agency as active protagonists in the living and telling of their own stories.

Run Time

95 mins
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Saturday 4 March, 13:45

A rare UK screening of Walter Saxer’s little-seen documentary about an experimental open-air penal colony in the Peruvian Amazon described by inmates as the ‘green hell’. With echoes of the work of frequent-collaborator, Werner Herzog, Saxer’s film stands as the only in-depth public record of a controversial facility that existed between 1951-1993 as a dumping ground for both hardened criminals and political prisoners. The film’s restrained, observational approach gives rise to a surprising and complex meditation on forms of justice, liberty and rehabilitation.

Director

Run Time

77 mins
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Friday 3 March, 17:30

Three short works by young filmmakers in Berwick, made collaboratively with artists Kimberley O’Neill and Kathryn Elkin. Applying techniques of digital filmmaking and documentary storytelling, the films explore entangled relationships between people, technology and the local environment.

Run Time

60 mins
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Saturday 4 March, 12:00

Renegade remixologists Soda Jerk return with Hello Dankness, a bent suburban musical comprised entirely of pirated film samples that bears witness to the psychotropic cultural spectacle of the period 2016 to 2021. Set in the American suburbs, the film follows a neighbourhood as consensus reality disintegrates into conspiracies and other political contagions. Part political satire, zombie stoner film and Greek tragedy, Hello Dankness is also informed by the encrypted memetics of contemporary internet culture.

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Run Time

69 mins
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