17th Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival 2021

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9 – 12 September 2021

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BFMAF’s 2021 Call for Entries has now closed. Thanks to all who entered, we will let you know about the selection status of your film by the 9th of August.

Check 2020’s 16th BFMAF and all the accompanying recordings, essays, and podcasts below, still there for you to enjoy!

New Cinema Competition Features

A brand new remodelled New Cinema Competition, where all selected filmmakers share the Berwick New Cinema Award. For easy viewing the selection is presented in two screenings, one for short and medium length works, and the second for features.

Each film encompasses BFMAF’s view of some of the most distinctive and unexpected works of new cinema being made around the world today, bringing original perspectives and new forms into being. These are vital works, imbued with a sense of liveness and agency in their resolute visions—they will surprise, entertain and provoke, opening up further questions and considerations.

Feature

This Is Not a Burial, It’s a Resurrection

Following the death of her only surviving relative, an elderly woman begins to make plans for her own funeral. Resistance and resentment build as her determination to be laid to rest in her ancestral home is disrupted by government plans to build a reservoir on the land.

Feature

maɬni – towards the ocean, towards the shore

The feature film debut of prolific Ho-Chunk filmmaker Sky Hopinka, maɬni – towards the ocean, towards the shore extends the promise of his meticulously crafted, short form experimental documentaries, while at the same time pushing towards new ideas, expressions and forms. A bifurcated portrait of the filmmaker’s two friends—Sweetwater Sahme and Jordan Mercier—the film weaves together their individual subjectivities while also purposefully never fully bringing them together.

Feature

N.P

Based on the 1990 experimental novel by Japanese author Banana Yoshimioto, Lisa Spilliaert’s feature debut N.P is a silent film translation of the text into a cinematic scenario. Translation itself is at the heart of N.P’s narrative, which details the compilations and absurdities of protagonist Kazami’s attempts to translate the short stories of fictional author Sarao Takase, as well as her sometimes disturbing interactions with the late author’s children. The previous three translators of Takase’s writing committed suicide in mysterious circumstances and Kazami’s encounters with his daughter (and lover) Sui increasingly pull her into a world of darkly chaotic energy.

Original book:

BANANA YOSHIMOTO “N.P” (published by Kadokawa Shoten Publishing Co., Ltd. in Japan) © 1990 BANANA YOSHIMOTO / “N.P”.