Apocalypse After

(Ultra Pulpe)

An abandoned seaside resort. The end of shooting a fantasy film about the end of the world. Apocalypse and Joy, two women involved in the movie, one an actor, the other the director, are about to end their relationship.

To delay Apocalypse’s departure and their last goodbye, Joy, the oldest of the two, tells her lover five dark stories. Five stories about women who don’t want to grow old. Five adventures in which science fiction, vulgarity, necrophilia, and poetry play a part.

‘Rather than telling a story Ultra pulpe follows a thread, inspired by the act of inventing and telling stories. Each sequence takes place on the set of one of the pulp movies directed by Joy (hence the title), skipping from one genre to the next: a post-apocalyptic future, a horror with monsters or ghosts, eroticism, a science- fiction set on Mars… The structure of Ultra pulpe mimics the pattern of Russian nesting dolls, as each new person encountered by Joy becomes immediately, through a simple cut, not only the star of the following movie presented on screen but also its prey. In a manner which is at the same time captivating, playful and clear- headed, Mandico symbolises throughout Ultra pulpe the dual nature of cinema, an art form where actors—and especially actresses—are equally celebrated and consumed’. —Erwan Desbois

Director Filmography

An abandoned seaside resort. The end of shooting a fantasy film about the end of the world. Apocalypse and Joy, two women involved in the movie, one an actor, the other the director, are about to end their relationship.

To delay Apocalypse’s departure and their last goodbye, Joy, the oldest of the two, tells her lover five dark stories. Five stories about women who don’t want to grow old. Five adventures in which science fiction, vulgarity, necrophilia, and poetry play a part.

“Rather than telling a story Ultra pulpe follows a thread, inspired by the act of inventing and telling stories. Each sequence takes place on the set of one of the pulp movies directed by Joy (hence the title), skipping from one genre to the next: a post-apocalyptic future, a horror with monsters or ghosts, eroticism, a science-fiction set on Mars… The structure of Ultra pulpe mimics the pattern of Russian nesting dolls, as each new person encountered by Joy becomes immediately, through a simple cut, not only the star of the following movie presented on screen but also its prey. In a manner which is at the same time captivating, playful and clear-headed, Mandico symbolises throughout Ultra pulpe the dual nature of cinema, an art form where actors—and especially actresses—are equally celebrated and consumed.” —Erwan Desbois

Production Year

2018

Premiere

Director

Country

Dialogue Language

French

Subtitle Language

English

Primary Contact

Louise Rinaldi

Distributor

Louise Rinaldi

Pool Party Pilot Episode

Pool Party Pilot Episode shows a speculative vision taking cues from Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s novel Herland and Elaine Morgan’s aquatic ape hypothesis, particularly parts where the authors describe male fears of their surroundings. Herland describes the encounter of three men with an isolated society composed entirely of women, who reproduce via parthenogenesis. The aquatic ape hypothesis aims to redress traditional evolutionary theories by focusing on the evolution of female bodies. —Hardeep Pandhal

The narrative of Hardeep Pandhal’s film—commissioned for the 2018 New Museum Triennial ‘Songs for Sabotage’—is delivered through its backing track, the artist’s lackadaisical rap hovering over strange, off-kilter beats. Reaching the surreal heights of the most fantastical Kool Keith lyric, Pandhal’s narration for Pool Party Pilot Episode builds its fantastic setting: a world in which women thrive after learning to reproduce asexually. The few men still living—bearded, floating spermatozoa, drifting through a world in which they are now disposable—resent this new matriarchal world order, becoming paranoid and restless, and ultimately deciding to take action against it.

Watching the film in an era becoming defined by an increasing visibility of extremist beliefs—men’s rights activists, incels or Infowars-style conspiracists among them—Pandhal’s film provides a parable for a future in which patriarchal society is reduced to rubble. Tapping into animation’s subversive potential for satire and cultural criticism, as well as its proclivity for the indecent and risqué, Pool Pilot Party Episode provokes questions about the fundamental aspects of contemporary society that are often taken for granted, a song for sabotage if there ever was one. —Herb Shellenberger

Production Year

2018

Premiere

Director

Country

Primary Contact

Hardeep Pandhal

Man in the Well

(JING LI DE REN)

Hu Bo’s posthumously-released short film Man in the Well was produced at the FIRST International Film Festival in Xining, China. Supervised by Béla Tarr, the seminar’s theme was ‘Apocalypse’, and Hu Bo succeeds in delivering a stark, atmospheric vision of end times that stacks up against the Hungarian auteur’s bleakest moments.

Man in the Well follows two starving kids, digging through the rubble of an abandoned building. Their survival impulse apparent, the duo also have something of a destructive streak, recalling both visually and in temperament the brutal gang of anoraked children in Shuji Terayama’s Emperor Tomato Ketchup. With an economy of means and a looming weight, the film ends with a disappearance, its young protagonists covered in blood and staring off into the middle distance. Much is left unspoken and any shred of innocence that could have remained until now is gone. —Herb Shellenberger & Becca Voelcker

Production Year

2018

Premiere

Director

Country

Dialogue Language

Mandarin

Subtitle Language

English

Primary Contact

Xu Jing

Distributor

Xu Jing

The Glorious Acceptance of Nicolas Chauvin

(Le Discours d’acceptation glorieux de Nicolas Chauvin)

While accepting a lifetime achievement award, Nicolas Chauvin—farmer-soldier, veteran of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, and the father of chauvinism—launches into a grand monologue reflecting on his life, sending him back in time and space…until, at a bend on a moonlit road, an encounter with a spectral figure will change his (non-)existence forever. —Benjamin Crotty

Opening to the vigorous strains of ‘Hooray for Hollywood’, The Glorious Acceptance of Nicolas Chauvin is a grand fête of the possibly- apocryphal French soldier, providing a convincing argument that Chauvin was the meme of his era. Commanding the stage with swagger of a stand-up comedian—complete with jabs at docile audience members and a drummer punctuating jokes with rimshots— the battle-worn soldier, clad in eyepatch and tattered military garb, launches into a speech which takes him all the way back to his birth, on ‘the best day of the best year of the best country of the best planet of the best solar system in the world’. Out of time in any era, Chauvin’s retrospective journey is interrupted by a mythical encounter which alters the course of his personal history.

Benjamin Crotty handily stretches out both meanings of chauvinism—extreme nationalism and misogynist bigotry—with a character who is simultaneously contemptible and utterly charming. He tosses off contemporary references from Deliveroo to Depardieu; describes himself as ‘a grenadier [by profession]…but a machine- gunner in the sack’; and, for no other reason than to get a rise out of his audience, exclaims ‘Jew!’ A timely study of social and political mores especially relevant to contemporary Europe and North America, The Glorious Acceptance of Nicolas Chauvin interestingly connects history to current events through a satirical, surprising and altogether quite inventive approach. —Herb Shellenberger

Director Filmography

Division Movement to Vungtau (2017), Collapse! Chroniques d’un monde en déclin (2016), Fort Buchanan (2014), Fort Buchanan: Hiver (2012), Liberdade (2011), Visionary Iraq (2008)

Production Year

2018

Premiere

Director

Country

Dialogue Language

French

Subtitle Language

English

Primary Contact

Benjamin Crotty

Producer

Judith Lou Levy Eve Robin

Cinematographer

Sean Price Williams

Other

Xuan Lan Hoang Soone Nicolas Brosseau Jessie Jeffrey Dunn

Production designer

Nicolas Lefebvre

Editor

Ael Dallier Vega

Sound design

Florent Castellani Charlotte Butrak Bruno Ehlinger

Costume design

Pauline Jaquard

Music composer

Ragnar Arni Agustsson