European Premiere

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Fox Maxy’s vertiginous montage documents the artist’s homecoming to Mesa Grande, California, ancestral lands of the Mesa Grande Band of Iipay/Kumeyaay/Diegueño Mission Indians in what is now called San Diego County. An exuberant mixtape of songs; portraits of friends, family, animals, and landscapes; and documents of confrontations with tribal cops, F1ghting Looks Different 2 Me Now is an exhilarating, joyful, and relentless disruption. No more drama.

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Run Time

17 mins

Outer and inner space collapse in Angelo Madsen Minax’s cosmic essay film which diffracts feelings, memories, and longings during a blurry sojourn in a remote cabin in the woods. Looking at the stars, flirting with guys on dating apps, taking ketamine (or not), and watching YouTube lecture videos, Minax draws a warped cartography of desire and distance. A humorous, psychedelic and deeply moving work, Bigger on the Inside is the latest in Minax’ transcendent cinema of trans embodiment.

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Run Time

12 mins

Between the dizzying hallucinatory landscapes and circular images of a lens or porthole, Hopinka takes us to a world of dreams, spirits and myths, revealing the story of Xąwįska, the Indian Pipe Plant used by the Ho-Chunk to revive those who have fainted. With abstracted and inverted images Hopinka moves from an editing station into the landscape, illuminating the sense of losing oneself, of fear and renewal. —Ruth Hodgins

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Run Time

11 mins

Between the dizzying hallucinatory landscapes and circular images of a lens or porthole, Hopinka takes us to a world of dreams, spirits and myths, revealing the story of Xąwįska, the Indian Pipe Plant used by the Ho-Chunk to revive those who have fainted. With abstracted and inverted images Hopinka moves from an editing station into the landscape, illuminating the sense of losing oneself, of fear and renewal. —Ruth Hodgins

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Country

Run Time

11 mins

Inquiring into the conditions necessary for harmonious social relationships, Ada Kaleh takes its name from a little-known island on the Danube River. Mythologised by Hungarian author Mór Jókai in 1872, it was submerged one century later during the construction of the Romanian-Yugoslavian Iron Gates hydroelectric power station.

The film performs a movement from the personal to the political—and from the domestic to the geopolitical—through a meticulous attunement to the cohabiting rhythms of the residents of a shared house, tracing their negotiation of space, privacy and sociality in a precarious ecosystem of sharing, intimacy and communion. Using continuous shots and richly-detailed close-ups, the material and affective surroundings of a simple sharing arrangement are rendered with gentle care and generous attention. An act of patient witnessing converts into a thinking and feeling-through of new ways of being together. In a present of polarised and fragmented social relations, it defiantly claims the ability to imagine new social and political communities. —Letitia Calin

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Run Time

15 mins

Developed with American poets CAConrad and Eileen Myles on the eve of the 45th presidential inauguration in February 2017, I Hope I’m Loud When I’m Dead is shot throughout the following year in America and Western Europe, with reference to mass refugee migration across the Mediterranean, the Grenfell Fire in London, and the consequences of political upheaval and war. Yet the film is also a deeply intimate work featuring seemingly-benign images of Gibson’s daily life. Seeking out the power of ritual, and casting the poet as prophet fit to navigate a different path through times of perilous authority, Gibson’s film proposes a way of moving through chaos with intimacy and empathy. I Hope I’m Loud When I’m Dead features a soundtrack by Laurence Crane and Pauline Oliveros.

I Hope I’m Loud When I’m Dead is a KW Production Series co-commission with Camden Arts Centre (London), Bergen Kunsthall (Bergen) and Mercer Union (Toronto)

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Run Time

21 mins

A short film about the life and work of the Kamjorn Sankwan, the film explores his work as a gaffer in the production of a Thai folk soap opera, a genre based on traditional Thai literature with Hindu cultural influences and fictional dynasties. The second half delves into Kamjorn’s personal interests, centralized around the mercenary soldiers who fought in exchange for Thai nationality.

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Run Time

16 mins

Set in Mueang Phayao, Invalid Throne examines the land and people who used to own property in the province. The disputed areas were overtaken by new feudalism and turned into a gold mine and an exclusive monastery, allowing only a select, elite few to enter its landscape. Shot on location in northern Thailand and in a studio (using a miniature landscape), the film weaves historical narrative with the personal memories of Kamjorn Sankwan, the artist and protagonist who was raised in that area, thereby raising questions to what constitutes as a national, collective history.

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Run Time

10 mins

Gulf was shot on the north shore of Cuba, looking towards the Gulf of Mexico, just months before a massive dead zone was created by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, which leaked 4.9 million barrels of oil between April 20-July 15, 2010.

Wave patterns fill the frame, pulling apart the film strip itself.

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Run Time

6 mins